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Christopher Long
Christopher Long

Mature Furry Art



Furry Art Pile, also known as FAP, was a furry art community which opened to the public on September 24, 2006. It relied on a system of tagging for organizing content. Mature artwork was permitted, but hidden by default.




mature furry art


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Furry Art Pile features an open developer API called fAPI that allows developers to create their own applications using the information on Furry Art Pile. Furry Art Pile was the only furry art website that offered an open API.


Ekigyuu has announced intentions to release the source code of the content management system that Furry Art Pile used to host and upload content under the GNU GPL for other furry multimedia sites to use[8]; this server software was codenamed "Guava". This will also include the release of the fAPI.


The furry fandom is a subculture interested in anthropomorphic animal characters.[1][2][3] Examples of anthropomorphic attributes include exhibiting human intelligence and facial expressions, speaking, walking on two legs, and wearing clothes. The term "furry fandom" is also used to refer to the community of people who gather on the internet and at furry conventions.[4]


The furry fandom has its roots in the underground comix movement of the 1970s, a genre of comic books that depicts explicit content.[5] In 1976, a pair of cartoonists created the amateur press association Vootie, which was dedicated to animal-focused art. Many of its featured works contained adult themes, such as "Omaha" the Cat Dancer, which contained explicit sex.[6] Vootie grew a small following over the next several years, and its contributors began meeting at science fiction and comics conventions.


According to fandom historian Fred Patten, the concept of furry originated at a science fiction convention in 1980,[7] when a character drawing from Steve Gallacci's Albedo Anthropomorphics started a discussion of anthropomorphic characters in science fiction novels. This led to the formation of a discussion group that met at science fiction conventions and comics conventions.


The specific term furry fandom was being used in fanzines as early as 1983, and had become the standard name for the genre by the mid-1990s, when it was defined as "the organized appreciation and dissemination of art and prose regarding 'Furries', or fictional mammalian anthropomorphic characters".[8] However, fans consider the origins of furry fandom to be much earlier, with fictional works such as Kimba, the White Lion, released in 1965, Richard Adams' novel Watership Down, published in 1972 (and its 1978 film adaptation), as well as Disney's Robin Hood as oft-cited examples.[7] Internet newsgroup discussion in the 1990s created some separation between fans of "funny animal" characters and furry characters, meant to avoid the baggage that was associated with the term "furry".[9]


During the 1980s, furry fans began to publish fanzines, developing a diverse social group that eventually began to schedule social gatherings. By 1989, there was sufficient interest to stage the first furry convention.[10] It was called Confurence 0, and was held at the Holiday Inn Bristol Plaza in Costa Mesa, California.[11] The next decade, the internet became accessible to the general population and became the most popular means for furry fans to socialize.[12] The newsgroup alt.fan.furry was created in November 1990, and virtual environments such as MUCKs also became popular places on the internet for fans to meet and communicate.[13]


Allegorical novels, including works of both science fiction and fantasy, and cartoons featuring anthropomorphic animals are often cited as the earliest inspiration for the fandom.[7] A survey conducted in 2007 suggested that, when compared with a non-furry control group, a higher proportion of those self-identifying as furries liked cartoons "a great deal" as children and recalled watching them significantly more often, as well as being more likely to enjoy works of science fiction than those outside of the community.[14]


According to a survey from 2008, most furries believe that visual art, conventions, literature, and online communities are strongly important to the fandom.[15] The furry fandom is male-dominated, with surveys reporting around 80% male respondents.[16][15][17]


Furry fans also pursue puppetry, recording videos and performing live shows such as Rapid T. Rabbit and Friends and the Funday PawPet Show, and create furry accessories, such as ears or tails.[21]


Anthropomorphic animal characters created by furry fans, known as fursonas,[22] are used for role-playing in MUDs,[23] on internet forums, or on electronic mailing lists.[24] A variety of species are employed as the basis of these personas, although many furry fans (for example over 60% of those surveyed in 2007) choose to identify themselves with carnivorans.[25][26] The longest-running online furry role-playing environment is FurryMUCK, which was established in 1990.[27] Many furry fans had their first exposure to the fandom come from multiplayer online role-playing games.[28][unreliable source?] Another popular online furry social game is called Furcadia, created by Dragon's Eye Productions. There are also several furry-themed areas and communities in the virtual world Second Life.[29]


Sufficient interest and membership has enabled the creation of many furry conventions in North America and Europe. A furry convention is for the fans get together to buy and sell artwork, participate in workshops, wear costumes, and socialize.[30] Anthrocon, in 2008 the largest furry convention with more than 5,861 attendees,[31] is estimated to have generated approximately $3 million to Pittsburgh's economy that year.[32] Another convention, Further Confusion, held in San Jose each January, closely follows Anthrocon in scale and attendance. US$470,000 was raised in conventions for charity from 2000 to 2009.[33] As of December 2017, Midwest FurFest is the world's largest furry convention.[34] It had a self-reported 2019 attendance of 11,019.[35]


The first known furry convention, ConFurence,[7] is no longer held; Califur has replaced it, as both conventions were based in Southern California. A University of California, Davis survey suggested that about 40% of furries had attended at least one furry convention.[16]


The internet contains a multitude of furry websites and online communities, such as art community websites Fur Affinity, Inkbunny, SoFurry and Weasyl; social networking sites Furry 4 Life and FurNation; and WikiFur, a collaborative furry wiki.[36]


There are several webcomics featuring animal characters created by or for furry fans; as such, they may be referred to as furry comics. One such comic, T.H.E. Fox, was first published on CompuServe in 1986, predating the World Wide Web by several years,[37] while another, Kevin and Kell by Bill Holbrook, has been awarded both a Web Cartoonists' Choice Award and an Ursa Major Award.[38][39]


The phrases furry lifestyle and furry lifestyler first appeared in July 1996 on the newsgroup alt.fan.furry during an ongoing dispute within that online community. The Usenet newsgroup alt.lifestyle.furry was created to accommodate discussion beyond furry art and literature, and to resolve disputes concerning what should or should not be associated with the fandom; its members quickly adopted the term furry lifestylers, and still consider the fandom and the lifestyle to be separate social entities. They have defined and adopted an alternative meaning of the word furry specific to this group: "a person with an important emotional/spiritual connection with an animal or animals, real, fictional, or symbolic."[40]


Sexual attraction to furry characters is a polarizing issue. In one survey with 4,300 furry respondents, 37% answered that sexual attraction is important in their furry activities, 38% were ambivalent, and 24% answered that it has little or nothing to do with their furry activities.[44] In an earlier online survey, 33% of furry respondents answered that they have a "significant sexual interest in furry", another 46% stated they have a "minor sexual interest in furry", and the remaining 21% stated they have a "non-sexual interest in furry". The survey specifically avoided adult-oriented websites to prevent bias.[17]


Another survey at a furry convention in 2013 found that 96.3% of male furry respondents reported viewing furry pornography, compared with 78.3% of female; males estimated 50.9% of all furry art they view is pornographic, compared with 30.7% female. The respondents to the survey had a slight preference for pornographic furry artwork over non-pornographic artwork. 17.1% of males reported that when they viewed pornography it was exclusively or near-exclusively furry pornography, and only about 5% reported that pornography was the top factor which got them into the fandom.[49]


An anonymous survey conducted by the Furry Research Center in 2008 found 17% of respondents identified as zoophiles. An earlier survey, conducted from 1997 to 1998, reported about 2% of furry respondents stating an interest in zoophilia, and less than 1% an interest in plushophilia (sexually aroused by stuffed animal toys). It has been suggested that the older, lower results, which are even lower than estimated in the general population, were due to the methodology of questioning respondents face-to-face, which may have led to social desirability bias.[43][50]


Early portrayal of the furries in magazines such as Wired,[51] Loaded,[52] Vanity Fair,[53] and the syndicated sex column "Savage Love" focused mainly on the sexual aspect of furry fandom. Fictional portrayals of furry fandom have appeared on television shows such as The Simpsons,[54][55] ER,[56] CSI: Crime Scene Investigation,[57] The Drew Carey Show,[58] Sex2K on MTV,[59] Entourage,[60] 1000 Ways to Die,[61] Tosh.0,[62][63] Check It Out! with Dr. Steve Brule,[64] and 30 Rock.[65] Most furry fans claim that these media portrayals are misconceptions,[66][67] while more recent coverage focuses on addressing the myths and stereotypes that have come to be associated with the furry fandom.[68] A reporter attending Anthrocon 2006 noted that "despite their wild image from Vanity Fair, MTV and CSI, furry conventions aren't about kinky sex between weirdos gussied up in foxy costumes", that conference attendees were "not having sex more than the rest of us",[69] and that the furry convention was about "people talking and drawing animals and comic-book characters in sketchbooks."[47] In October 2007, a Hartford Advocate reporter attended FurFright 2007 undercover because of media restrictions. She learned that the restrictions were intended to prevent misinformation, and reported that the scandalous behavior she had expected was not evident.[70] Recent coverage of the furry fandom has been more balanced. According to Ian Wolf, a 2009 article from the BBC entitled "Who are the furries?" was the first piece of journalism to be nominated for an Ursa Major Award, the main awards given in the field of anthropomorphism.[12][71][72] 041b061a72


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