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Christopher Long
Christopher Long

Surviving Object-Oriented Projects


Today, many organizations claim competitive market advantages resulting from the application of object-oriented technology and approaches in their software development efforts. As the use of object technology has become increasingly widespread and mainstream, a growing number of project managers are faced with a daunting task: keeping the object technology project on track and within budget. These project managers are burdened by the weight of knowing that the survival and ultimate success of the project hinges on their insight when planning the project and their responses to events that lie ahead. Unfortunately, hidden costs, unpleasant surprises and unrealistic expectations lie in wait for the unprepared manager.




Surviving Object-Oriented Projects


Download: https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Furluso.com%2F2ue07D&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AOvVaw05HU_ruvR89ucuLdKoGzCb



Although much has been written about object technology and the benefits of this paradigm, there is still a shortage of compiled knowledge about what to expect and to plan for during project implementation. This book provides information that managers need to combat the unforeseen challenges that await them, allowing them to survive and ultimately succeed with an object-oriented project.


To provide practical advice and guidelines for successfully managing an object-oriented project, the author borrows from the seasoned wisdom of numerous experts and successful consultants while also drawing on his personal experience and extensive knowledge. Surviving Object-Oriented Projects: A Manageris Guide points out potential hazards and names workable solutions by addressing the important issues of scheduling, budgeting, staffing, and cost justification. Key points are supported and illustrated through short case studies taken from real object-oriented projects, and an appendix collects these workable guidelines and solutions into brief icrib sheetsio ideal for handy reference.


Alistair Cockburn is a recognized expert on use cases. He is consulting fellow at Humans and Technology, where he is responsible for helping clients succeed with object-oriented projects. He has more than twenty years of experience leading projects in hardware and software development in insurance, retail, and e-commerce companies and in large organizations such as the Central Bank of Norway and IBM.


To provide practical advice and guidelines for successfully managing an object-oriented project, the author borrows from the seasoned wisdom of numerous experts and successful consultants while also drawing on his personal experience and extensive knowledge. Surviving Object-Oriented Projects: A Manageris Guide points out potential hazards and names workable solutions by addressing the important issues of scheduling, budgeting, staffing, and cost justification. Key points are supported and illustrated through short case studies taken from real object-oriented projects, and an appendix collects these workable guidelines and solutions into brief icrib sheetsio ideal for handy reference.


Alistair Cockburn is a recognized expert on use cases. He is consulting fellow at Humans and Technology, where he is responsible for helping clients succeed with object-oriented projects. He has more than twenty years of experience leading projects in hardware and software development in insurance, retail, and e-commerce companies and in large organizations such as the Central Bank of Norway and IBM.


Alistair Cockburn is a Cutter Expert and consulting fellow at Humans and Technology, where he helps clients succeed with object-oriented projects, including corporate strategy, project setup, staff mentoring, process development, technical design, and design quality. He is the originator of Crystal Light methodology and has more than 20 years' experience in leading projects. Dr. Cockburn was special advisor on project management and development issues to the Central Bank of Norway. He coordinated a critical multisite development project using the ideas he advocates: light methodology; a flexible, alert process; communication; and thinking. In the early 1990s, Dr. Cockburn designed the OO methodology for IBM's worldwide Consulting Group, which is still in use today and is applied to business process reengineering. He served on the IBM US Marketing and Services Architecture Advisory Board, for which he reviewed project plans and designs; is the author of Surviving Object-Oriented Projects; and has written papers and articles for a variety of trade journals.


The German consulting company sd&m (part of Ernst & Young) invited Dr. Cockburn to work with 10 of its senior project managers over several months to capture their experience and the risk-reducing strategies they use on projects. The strategies were captured as patterns in Dr. Cockburn's special "medical pattern" format. The captured patterns will help newer project managers learn to observe and reduce risks on their own projects.


Back in the mid-1990s, I wrote and published Pitfalls of Object-Oriented Development (M&T Books, 1995). The book captured lessons learned from five years of full-time commercial software development using object-oriented technology, as well as cautions and observations gleaned from books and articles on the subject. Shortly after the book went into publication, I started plans to do a second edition, but M&T Books lost interest in the book itself and let it go out of print, which (according to the publishing agreement) meant that the publication rights reverted back to me.


In the years since Pitfalls came out, most of my professional career has been focused on why information technology (IT) projects fail (and succeed). I have conducted reviews of major IT projects within corporations, some with budgets in the hundreds of millions of dollars. In some cases, after presenting my findings, I have then been asked to help get the project back on track. Also, since 1999, I served as a consulting/testifying expert in lawsuits involving disputed, troubled or failed IT projects, in some cases with budgets over $1 billion.


For any of the assignments in this class, including the project, please feel free to use any of the free and/or open-source (FOSS) object-oriented programming languages in the set Java, Ruby, JavaScript, Python, C++ .


A must-have classic for all software designers. Anyone who works with object-oriented technology must read it. It contains practically proven solutions to common design problems arising in the everyday life of a software designer. The authors offer comprehensive and useful examples for each design pattern.


A picture is worth a thousand words, as the old saying goes, and visual sources provide further evidence. These include period pattern books for architecture and furnishings, as well as drawings, prints, and paintings that enhance our understanding of period building and furnishing practices or simply help us envision how a building or landscape appeared to an 18th-century visitor. The few surviving early views of Mount Vernon provide benchmarks of changes to the exterior and the landscape design. Photographic images of Mount Vernon from the 19th century and later also enable us to identify when physical changes were made to the Mansion.


Evaluating the physical evidence, or material culture, begins with the Mansion and other original buildings, identifying and dating different architectural features, such as woodwork, plaster, masonry, flooring, framing and even wallpaper fragments. Archaeological findings are reviewed and compared with documentary evidence for furnishings and materials used at Mount Vernon, and surviving decorative arts objects with Washington histories, from chairs to fabrics to table wares, are analyzed to understand who, when, where, and how they were used.


The Curatorial team, consisting of curators and object conservators, leads the investigation and installation of furnishings in the Mansion. We aim to show how the furnishings of a room appeared in 1799 and to do so in a dynamic way that allows visitors to understand how the people of Mount Vernon used and related to these spaces. With each restoration project, curators develop a furnishing plan based on analysis of all the available evidence, from surviving furnishings, archaeological artifacts, and documentary and visual sources.


In general, no. There are some software developments wherepredictability is possible. Organizations such as NASA's space shuttlesoftware group are a prime example of where software development canbe predictable. It requires a lot of ceremony, plenty of time, a largeteam, and stable requirements. There are projects out there that arespace shuttles. However I don't think much business software fits intothat category. For this you need a different kind of process.


So if you are in a situation that isn't predictable you can'tuse a predictive methodology. That's a hard blow. It means that manyof the models for controlling projects, many of the models for thewhole customer relationship, just aren't true any more. The benefitsof predictability are so great, it's difficult to let them go. Like somany problems the hardest part is simply realizing that the problemexists. 041b061a72


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